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COMPASS SENSORS

A5024
NMEA183 Compass 
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A5041
NMEA183 Gyro Compass 
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A5050
NMEA2000 Compass 
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A5060
NMEA2000 Gyro Compass 
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Either NMEA0183 or 2000 output format

 

Water resistant to IP68

 

Auto Calibration by button-press

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Set-Zero by button-press

                

0183 versions are user-configurable for compatibility

    

Pitch and Roll corrected to ±45˚

The Autonnic Compass Sensor uses fluxgate technology to provide the most accurate magnetic heading, meeting the requirements of all navigation displays and devices on board. The electronic compass unit is weather tight, allowing an optimal installation position inside or outside the hull.  The compass works by taking the magnetic heading and converting it into a digital signal for use by chart plotters, Autopilots, AIS systems and other electronic devices onboard.

In the A5041 gyro model, heading output is additionally derived by integrating the rate output from a MEMS yaw accelerometer or ‘gyro’ which is drift-corrected by a fluxgate magnetometer with pitch and roll compensation up to 45°.

A5035
Simrad Legacy Compass 
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Older Simrad® Autopilots can be kept going with this functional alternative to the RFC35.

 

Simrad is a TM of Navico

A4032
Compass Pick Up
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Add an Autonnic Indicator (A5501) to make a complete TMC.  

 

The A4032 gives a NMEA 0183 heading directly from the Ships’ Compass.

 

Manually calibrated to the Master Compass.

 

Centre-hole fixing.

Compass Pick Up Sensor

The A4032 Autonnic Compass Pick Up Sensor takes the magnetic data generated by an existing yacht compass and converts it into NMEA0183 data to use for a variety of on-board purposes. The Pick Up Sensor avoids the need to install a standalone compass unit minimising cost and system complexity. Its roots are found in larger vessels where the ship’s compass is precisely calibrated and for certification purposes acts as the reference point for all navigation systems.